FILE – Former two-time world heavyweight champion George Foreman smiles during the ‘Fists of Gold’ boxing event in Macau on April 6, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Dale de la Rey (Photo by DALE de la REY / AFP)

MANILA, Philippines — Mike Tyson made a stunning announcement that he is facing Roy Jones Jr. with the two former undisputed champions, who are now in their 50s, figuring in an eight-round exhibition.

Still, a couple of legends duking it out for charity is always a welcome event especially during this time of a pandemic.

But for another legend in the sport in George Foreman, who knows a thing or two about fighting even at an advanced age, Tyson and Jones should still be wary of the dangers that may come with what they’re about to do.

Foreman fought competitively for 28 years and until he was 48 years old and he is fully aware of the consequences of fighting at a certain age.

“There’s a time when you’ve got to worry about your health, but it’s a beautiful thing that they would even come out [and fight],” said Foreman in an interview with TMZ Sports as posted on BoxingScene.com. “Perhaps they can name a charity to be the recipient of the funds. I think it’s good to come out, but it’s got to be a fun thing.”

“Boxing is nothing to play with. I would tell them that it’s really dangerous.”

Tyson won’t be receiving any pay in his comeback fight that’s slated for September 12 in California as proceeds of the pay-per-view bout is expected to be donate to several charities.

The 54-year-old Tyson said he has been training for the past several months. He last fought in 2005 when he lost to unheralded journeyman Kevin McBride.

Jones, 51, meanwhile, fought well into the 2010s with his last fight being a unanimous decision win against Scott Simon in 2018.

Foreman knows that Tyson and Jones are already aware of the risks they’re taking and that his advice could very well be just for naught, knowing that he had the same mentality back then when he was younger.

“Big George” first stepped away from boxing in 1977 when he was just 28 but came back in 1987 to continue on for 10 more years.

“When you make up your mind to do something like that, you can’t tell them not to do it. They’re not going to hear that. Even me, a big fool like me, back in the day, I only saw what I wanted to see,” said Foreman.


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